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2014 Audi S6 Maintenance Service

Audi S6

Mark: Hi, it’s Mark, Top Local Lead Generation; we’re here with Mr. Bernie Pawlik of Pawlik Automotive in Vancouver, 16 time winners of Best Auto Repairs in Vancouver.

Mark: So, Audio S6, this is a pretty hot little number;  you had to do some maintenance?

Bernie: Yes, it had about 25,000 kilometers and was due for a maintenance service. Basically the service that was required at this point in time was an oil change, oil and filter, the air filter was dirty and we replaced that, wiper blades were smudgy, those were replaced and a full vehicle inspection and we didn’t really find a lot of issues with the car, low mileage, 25,000 kilometers is still pretty low so the brakes were good, everything else was in good shape.

Mark: So what does the Factory Maintenance Schedule say to do for this Audi?

Bernie: So, it’s oil changes is every 15,000 kilometers or once a year, every 12 months which I think is great. There are a lot of European cars, BMW specifically, they have 24,000 kilometers oil change intervals which and actually Porsches are like that too. I think it’s ridiculous, I mean that’s a really long time to go with engine oil.It could probably be OK if you did nothing but straight highway driving and you put that kind of mileage on in a year, but anything else you really have got to change it more often and Audi at 15,000 kilometers with 8 ½ litres of oil: that’s a really good oil change interval. The oil’s going to get dirty but not excessively at that point; so that’s a good time. It is an expensive oil change in these cars just like it is on a BMW or a Porsche but, you know, it’s worth the money to spend a little extra to keep the intervals done at a more timely fashion.

So that’s the annual service, it’s an oil change and the basic inspection, then the every 2 years’ service is, includes the inspection we just did so it’s a full comprehensive inspection, also replace cabin air filters and brake fluid flush are recommended every 2 years on this car, other than that there’s not much else, I did look at the maintenance schedule further ahead, spark plugs are up at about 90,000 kilometers so you have a long ways to go before you replace those.

Mark: So this is a fairly high performance car, what kind of features does it have?

Bernie: Well, it’s pretty amazing, it’s a twin turbo V8 engine and it goes like stink, it’s just awesome. The interior features: I could go on for a long time, amazing upholstered seats and climate control and navigation system and all that stuff but I thought I would just share a couple pictures because every once in a while I come across a car and it’s just got an absolutely gorgeous looking engine. Almost all cars now a days have plastic covers over top of their engine but even this plastic cover is a beautiful work of art. So many of them are just plain covers but this looks beautiful just without taking it off; but underneath is where it’s really cool and this is what’s underneath that cover which is almost scary. There’s a lot of stuff under this cover and we’re not even really looking at the engine at this point, those nice shiny gold pieces are the two turbochargers so you’ve got your air inlets and exhaust system. Underneath is the engine; it’s a kind of car where you really don’t want to be getting into doing any service at all on this thing, you want to make sure it stays in good shape for a long, long time because it will be expensive, there’s a lot in there to take care of.

Audi S6

Engine compartment of Audi S6 with engine cover installed.

Audi S6

Audi S6 engine exposed. There is a lot of complexity to this engine.

It’s also got the direct fuel injection which makes this car so powerful and responsive, it’s an awesome feature, Volkswagen uses this on a lot of their engines and in a lot of cars nowadays: it’s like the diesel fuel injection where the fuel is injected directly into the cylinders and not into the intake manifold like traditional fuel injection. This actually brings me to another maintenance item which is not on the manufacturer's list but is something that should be done probably every two to three years and that is doing a fuel system cleaning to remove carbon deposits from the engine. That’s something we can do and we can talk further about that in another hangout but that’s a service that like the Motorvac Fuel Injection Cleaning we used to do but that service is really not relevant on an engine like this because of the way the fuel injection system is differently designed. We’ll do a hangout on that in the future and talk about that.

Mark: Any further thoughts on the S6?

Bernie: No, it’s just a nice car, if you’ve some money to buy a nice car to bomb around in, all-wheel drive, go fast and very comfortable too, it’s a great car.

Mark: Great, so if you need some service on your Audi, these are the guys to go see are Pawlik Automotive. You can reach them at 604-327-7112 to book your appointment. They have a lot of bays now they’ve expanded and a lot of great techs doing a lot of great work or you can check out their website pawlikautomotive.com. There are many years of amazing information. Bernie gets calls from all over the world, sometimes that’s not good but it is an example of a worldwide authority on auto repair and so if you want somebody like that working on your car these are the guys to go see. Thanks Bernie.

Bernie: Thanks Mark.

For more about the Audi S6 click on this link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi_S6

Audi S4 Clutch Replacement

Audi S4

Our featured post is clutch replacement on a 2010 Audi S4

Audi S4

2010 Audi S4

While this article is about clutch replacement what inspired its writing was not the dual mass flywheel or modern clutch technology but the use of innovative weight saving materials related to this job.

Auto manufacturers are constantly looking for ways to save weight for improved fuel economy and engine performance. It only makes sense that shaving a few hundred pounds from the car will require less fuel, and that a 300 horsepower engine will move a lighter car much faster.

On many high end cars, aluminum frames and body metal are utilized; this is moving down to vehicles like the Ford F150 pickup which now utilizes an aluminum frame.

Our featured Audi certainly has aluminum in the body but it was while doing this clutch replacement that we saw some additional weight reduction features. First was the transmission to engine bolts which are made of aluminum. It’s quite bizarre to hold these large bolts in your hand: they are feather weight. From years of working on cars we definitely get a feel for the weight of a bolt and these are so light. Its like holding nothing.

Audi S4

Photo of transmission bell housing show 3 new aluminum bolts

The only disadvantage of these bolts is that they are one time use only. We notice this happening with more European cars, and for many jobs, bolts must be costed into the service.

The other weight reduction part that we noted from this job was the clutch slave cylinder which was made entirely of plastic. It too was feather weight.

These are just a couple examples of what manufacturers are doing to reduce weight. While the bolts and slave cylinder probable reduce the weight by a kilogram at most when these materials are used throughout the car the reduction can be impressive.

Clutch replacement on this Audi S4 is time consuming and expensive. As with most high end European cars many hours are required to remove the transmission and clutch, replace the parts and perform the reinstallation. It seems that German car makers just have a way of making things more complex than they need to be. This clutch utilizes a dual mass flywheel and there is no single mass conversion kit available. With all the labour involved in removing and reinstalling the transmission it makes no sense to risk not changing the flywheel at the same time as the clutch.

Audi S4

Clutch assembly all bolted together and ready for installation.

This Audi S4 is a beautiful car to drive: it’s handling is tight, the engine is agile and powerful and the manual transmission shifts beautifully. All of this expensive and complex clutch technology along with lightweight materials is just a small part of what make this happen.

For more about the Audi S4 click here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi_S4

For an interesting study on vehicle weights and reduction options click here https://mitei.mit.edu/system/files/OTRin2035_Chapter-3.pdf

Pre-purchase Inspection Performed On A 2012 Audi A7

Audi A7

Today’s featured service is a pre-purchase inspection performed on a 2012 Audi A7, brought to us by a client from Granview-Woodlands, Vancouver.

Audi A7

2012 Audi A7

Prepurchase inspections are a frequent service at our shop and are very valuable to both the buyer and the seller of a vehicle. It is essential to know the status of the vehicle and nothing does this better than an unbiased inspection report.

For a seller it is vital to know the condition of the vehicle you are selling to be sure it is a safe and reliable vehicle, and if work needs to be done you can either disclose it or have it done. Knowing the condition of the vehicle also helps if the buyer gets an inspection and comes with a laundry list of problems used to negotiate a lower price. If you truly know it’s a good car you can command a higher price.

A prepurchase inspection is even more important for the buyer. Once you buy a used car you are generally stuck with it. Just driving a car can tell you a lot however it doesn’t tell all. Brakes can feel fine but you could be a month away from needing a thousand (or more) dollar brake job. An engine could be running fine but have serious fluid leaks that may not be apparent until the vehicle is inspected on a hoist. If the inspection finds any issues then you can make a powerful choice about the car or truck. Do you buy it or negotiate a better price? I’ve had more than a few people walk away from a deal and tell me the inspection was the best money they’d spent.

Audi A7

View of Audi A7 engine and its 3 Liter Supercharged engine.

Onto our featured vehicle: the 2012 Audi A7. We did this inspection for the selling dealer: a dealer who takes pride in selling fine quality, trouble free used cars. Having about 25,000 kilometers on the odometer and being only 3 years old there was little wrong with this car. But there was still a couple of things: while brakes were good tire treads were getting down. There was also a minor oil seep under the engine and the vehicle was due for a service. Fortunately for the owner the oil leak was covered by the manufacturer’s warranty and the maintenance service was still covered by the dealer’s maintenance plan.

The Audi A7 is an awesome car with amazing technology inside the car and under the hood. It is quick, smooth and luxurious. In an era of engines shrouded with plastic covers this engine is a beauty to look at. The car also features, among many amazing features massive disc brakes to slow this beast down quickly and safely.

Audi A7

Front wheel and tire on 2012 Audi A7. Note the large brake caliper and rotor.

Here are a few final points: 1) whether you are buying or selling, and you value an honest vehicle transaction, having a good prepurchase inspection is essential. 2) How the inspection is done and interpreted is critical. Every inspection is case specific and depends on the vehicle, the age, the price and the usage. What may be a problem on one car may not be much on another.

Audi A7

Center 2 pages of our 4 page 150 point inspection sheet.

For more about the Audi A7 click here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi_A7

Audi Vehicles – How are they for Reliability?

pawlik-automotive-audi

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark: Hi, it’s Mark Bossert from Top Local Lead Generation. We’re here this morning with Mr. Bernie Pawlik. He’s a Master Mechanic in Vancouver BC and he’s the owner of Pawlik Automotive which is a very heavily award winning kind of auto service place voted by their customers 12 times in a row so far, as the best auto service place in Vancouver. How are you doing Bernie?

Bernie: Really good, very good.

Mark: So we’re going to talk about Audi’s and I know that Audi is part of Volkswagen, for quite a while now but how much different than Volkswagens are they?

Bernie: Well, there are a lot of similarities between Volkswagen and Audi and you’ll kind of see them more in the high end Volkswagens and the low end Audi’s, the similarities between the cars are quite noticeable. The engine platforms are shared between the two brands and this can work to your advantage if you own a lower end Audi, you’ve got basically a Volkswagen car which maybe doesn’t sound so good but it’s fixed up inside, it makes it a lot nicer car. The great thing about that is you know the more cars a manufacturers sells that are similar, the cheaper the parts are so it keeps your repair cost down and the labour operation may still be expensive but the parts are cheaper so that ends up helping you out in the long run. Some of the models that are similar are the VW Passat and the Audi A4, they share similar platforms and in the SUV area which we’ll talk more about later, VW Touareg and the Audi Q7 are similar vehicles as actually is the Porsche Cayenne, they all share the same platform although there’s clearly some differences between all those models. You know while we notice the similarity’s too between Volkswagen and Audi it’s just the feel of the vehicles, the way their built, there’s a certain German Volkswagen Audi feel to them which you see even in a mid-grade Volkswagen right up to a high end Audi, you know the fit and finish is certainly a lot better in the Audi, there’s a lot more buttons and accessories and things so you certainly know you’re in a luxury car with an Audi.

Mark: So you recently wrote a couple of blog articles about Audi being cheap to repair and then expensive to repair so can you elaborate on that?

Bernie: Yeah, the point I was trying to make in the first article about being cheaper to repair is most people have this idea that European cars are expensive to fix and for a lot of part that’s true but sometimes they are actually extremely inexpensive to fix and the point with the Audi, you know, this particular vehicle had an engine misfire, quite a severe misfire, it had a bad ignition coil and the price of the coils they were so cheap and these were not some made in China cheap, you know, copies they were name brand German made parts, they were so cheap, I could buy four of them for less than the price of one ignition coil for my Subaru H6 so just because it’s an Audi or Volkswagen or Mercedes or BMW for that matter doesn’t necessarily mean that the car’s going to be more expensive to fix, sometimes it can be actually substantially cheaper than a Japanese or American car but then you know the same week with an Audi A4 the transmission control module went bad and it was a $3,000 repair so it’s things like that, sometimes they’re cheap, sometimes they are really expensive but just because it’s a European car or Audi for that matter doesn’t mean it’s going to be expensive to fix.

Mark: So, what sort of repairs do you find with Audi’s and today we’re going to concentrate here on the SUV’s.

Bernie: Yeah, generally they’re pretty good cars but there are a few things that happen with them. Volkswagen, Audi vehicles, they tend to have a lot of electrical and electronic problems so you’ll find that if you’ve owned them for a long period of time you have a few issues with those. The brakes on the like the Q7 they seem to wear out really fast, they’re expensive to fix, tires wear out very fast too. I’ve had a number of people who bought them have been sort of disappointed with how much money they spend on maintenance and repairs. They’re a big vehicle and I’m not certain with the brakes, why they wear out so fast. I see that with a lot of other European SUV’s as well like Range Rovers, the brakes don’t last very long and yet they’re absolutely enormous, based on the size of the brake, it is a big vehicle but based on the size of the brake they should last for 150,000 kilometres and I’m not certain what causes them to wear out so quickly but the fact is, they do and whichever brand of parts we use seems to all wear at the same rate.
Some of the engines in these vehicles are very well built, they’re good quality but the oil changes or maintenance service is expensive, it’s all synthetic oil which leads to longer oil service interval but it does add expense. I’m thinking, brakes, tire wear; if you own an Audi SUV you’re definitely going to be spending more money than you will if you buy a Lexus, say, you know, if you’re looking in the luxury SUV market; beautiful cars tho, for sure. The VW Touareg is very similar and the high end Touareg’s their fit and finish on those is quite nice, almost close to an Audi but the Audi’s are a jump ahead. I know we’re not talking about Porsche today but the Cayenne is the same; it’s built on the same platform but they got to take it to a whole new level with performance and speed and try to get the sports car feel to it.

But that’s basically a lot of what goes on with those vehicles.

Mark: So high end luxury vehicle, great performance. How’s the diesel in the SUV?

Bernie: They’re good; these are a different model than we talked about TDI’s last week, they use a V6 diesel in the Q7’s and the Touareg’s as well. Really reliable so far, you know, that we haven’t seen a lot of problems with them so, I don’t have a lot more to say about them. They’re good and gives a nice option; you have a luxury diesel vehicle, that’s not much more I can say so far, we’ve seen very few problems with them.

Mark: Any last thought about Audi?

Bernie: You know Audi’s have come a long way, they used to be a kind of quirky, a bit of a quirky car going way back, you know as I’ve said before, written before, back around the late 90’s with the introduction of the A40 Audi brand really became a more mainstream, well-built vehicle and also way more popular so it was popular, that’s a good thing because they sell more of them and the cars tend to be built better. So any last thoughts? They are a great vehicle but you will, especially SUV’s, you will spend more money on those vehicle than you would if you owned a Lexus or even a large American luxury sedan, something like Cadillac Escalade; but good vehicle, very nice but definitely more expensive to repair.

Mark: Great. Thanks Bernie. So we’ve been talking with Bernie Pawlik of Pawlik Automotive in Vancouver. They’re an award winning shop voted by their customers 12 times in a row as the best auto repair in Vancouver. Give them a call at 604-327-7112? What’s the number Bernie?

Bernie: 604-327-7112. You can tell it’s early, we’re both not thinking. Anyway, thanks Mark, appreciate it, we’ll talk again soon.

Mark: Thanks, bye.

How are Audi Cars to Service and Repair

So you work on Audis. Aren’t they a difficult vehicle to service?

Mark: Hi, it’s Mark Bossert from Top Local Lead Generation. We’re here with award winning Vancouver auto repair, the owner, Mr. Bernie Pawlik of Pawlik Automotive. How’re you doing Bernie?
Bernie: I’m doing really well, how’re you Mark?
Mark: I’m good. So we’re going to talk about Audis today and how are Audis to work on?
Bernie: Well they’re good. A little bit about Audis; Audis the high end division of Volkswagen but interestingly enough low end Audis are very similar to the higher end Volkswagen. They share a lot of the same parts, they look similar, the engines and transmissions are the same, the body styles are similar. A couple examples are the Audi A4 and the Volkswagen Passat are quite similar vehicles, another example would be the Audi Q7 and the Volkswagen Touareg Sport Utility vehicles those are very similar, built on the same platform, actually the Porsche Cayenne is actually a same vehicle as well only dressed up a little higher and more performance. So it could be a good thing having sort of a fancy sports car that’s similar to another lower end car because there’s a lot of parts available for a lower price.
Mark: So, you mentioned that aren’t Audis expensive to fix?
Bernie: Well, they can be, you know that’s a good question. The answer is yes and no. Generally they are a fairly expensive car to fix but sometimes they can be quite cheap. Last week we were working on a 2006 Audi A4 and it needed an ignition coil, the coil was only $35 which is just outrageously cheap, 4 coils in the vehicle, that’s just doing the quick math, $140. A lot of Japanese cars you can’t buy one coil for that price, you might even pay twice the price for a coil, so you know sometimes you get surprised with European cars like Audis, they can be incredibly inexpensive. Now on the other hand of the scale, last week we also had another Audi A4 that had a transmission control module that was blown, it was 22 hundred dollars for that part, plus labour and diagnosis, it ended up being a really hefty bill so that’s the kind of thing you expect with an Audi but not all repairs are like that. A lot of German cars can be like that, the electronics can be a bit of a problem and they are expensive.
Mark: So what are some of the other issues you see with Audi?
Bernie: Well, ignition coil failures are one of the issues I just alluded to, many Audis they have a complex crank case breather system and the parts, things go defective with that, so that requires some repairs, many models of timing belts and they need to be replaced every once in a while, the engines also have oil leaks from time to time, wheel bearings wear out also.
Mark: So Audi had that tarnished, bad reputation in the 80’s for running on. What was all that about?
Bernie: In the early 1980’s the Audi brought in a new series of cars, the 5000. They were marketed as marvels of technology and advanced engineering but they had one issue, occasionally some models would suddenly accelerate without warning. Interestingly enough these cars were generally sold to people who were fairly well to do so they’re pretty educated, smart people, they had nice houses and things, some of them ended up in people’s swimming pools, they would just take off and go flying along the driveway and through their garage and into the swimming pool. It happened on a few occasions and the media picked up a lot of stories about it. Audi basically told people there’s nothing wrong with the car, it’s your fault, so it took a long time to get things figured out. I did a little research on it and they figure it was partially due to an idle stabilization motor that would sometimes kick the idle speed up a bit too high and that may be coupled with people, they figured that maybe the pedals weren’t properly positioned in the car. It was bad PR situation from Audis point of view and their sales plummeted through the 80’s and 90’s and apparently they didn’t actually pick up back until the year 2000. But in the meantime they got their act together and built some better cars and one thing that we owe to that whole incident is the shift lock mechanism that you find in any car with an automatic transmission, it’s been around for a good twenty years anyways, where you have to put your foot firmly on the brake before you can shift out of park so that’s all because of the great engineering coffule about Audi.
Mark: So do you have any last thoughts or comments about Audi?
Bernie: Well, Audi cars are generally they’re nice cars but to me they always seemed a bit quirky for a long time, kind of unusual until they brought the A4 out which happened around 1996, 97. It was a pretty nice car, normal, not too many problems and from there I think Audi became more mainstream; their sales have gone up and there are a lot of different models on the road. They’re good cars generally pretty reliable, they got a few problems like any car, maybe a little more than a Japanese car, but generally very nice car and you can get some really nice high end models, really nice cars to drive, so those are my thoughts.
Mark: Great. So I’ve been talking with award winning, multiple, 12 times voted best in Vancouver, award winning auto repair shop and the owner of that shop, Mr. Bernie Pawlik, Pawlik Automotive, you can reach him at pawlikautomotive.com or you can give him a call 604-327-7112. Thanks Bernie.
Bernie: Thanks Mark, have a good night.

2003 Audi A4 – Transmission Control Unit

Audi A4

Today’s featured repair is replacement of the Transmission Control Unit on a 2003 Audi A4 Convertible, brought to us by a client from Killarney, Vancouver.

Audi A4

2003 Audi A4 Convertible

 

Hot on the heels of our last post where we featured an Audi that was inexpensive to repair we encountered the exact opposite: an Audi with an expensive repair.

Our featured vehicle was towed to our shop as it was pretty much undriveable. During our diagnostic we retrieved several trouble codes that were associated with a communication error to the transmission control unit. We proceeded to thoroughly test all related circuits and components where we found the control unit to be faulty.

Control units for any vehicle are generally expensive but this one was very pricey at over $2200.00! Adding to the repair cost was diagnostic labour, remove and install labour along with expensive transmission fluid, several gaskets, seals and bolts (and taxes as well). Its the sort of repair where you wish that you weren’t driving an Audi.

After the work was completed the car ran great and functioned as it was meant to. In defense of the repair this vehicle is 11 years old and the replaced part should last equally as long, or hopefully longer if  some updates were made to the part.

In criticism of Audi, and other European cars, failures of these very expensive electronic components are more frequent than in Japanese and American cars.

This vehicle is equipped with a CVT or Continuously Variable Transmission. This type of transmission has become increasingly popular in the past decade. Unfortunately many manufacturers have had problems with them. Nissan certainly comes to mind; and they have extended their warranty to 10 years for most CVT failures. Audi has had a great number of failures with their CVT units as well and has dealt with a class action law suit in the US.

So while we previously busted the myth that Audi’s are expensive to fix in our last post we now find that many times Audi’s (and German cars) live up to their reputation as being very expensive to fix.

For more about CVT transmissions click this link http://auto.howstuffworks.com/cvt.htm

For move about the class action lawsuit against Audi regarding their CVT transmissions click here http://goo.gl/JNWNxW

Audi A4

Transmission Control Unit ready to install in 2003 Audi A4 with CVT transmission. It’s hard to believe that this part costs over $2200. just by looking at it.

 

2006 Audi A4 – Ignition Coil Replacement

Audi A4

Our latest featured service is Ignition Coil Replacement performed on a 2006 Audi A4, brought to us by a client from Little Mountain, Vancouver.

Audi A4

2006 Audi A4 with 2 Liter Turbocharged Engine

The ignition coil is an integral part of a gasoline powered engine’s ignition system. Its function is to generate the high voltage required to fire the spark plug(s), which in turn ignites the compressed air and fuel in the engine’s cylinder. The Audi A4 2 liter turbocharged engine in this vehicle uses 4 ignition coils, 1 per cylinder. There are tremendous advantages to this system as the vehicle’s powertrain computer can precisely fire each spark at the optimal time. The computer can also monitor the energy consumption used in each ignition and determine how successful that combustion event was.

Ignition system have evolved tremendously over the years. A couple of decades ago most engines had one ignition coil to fire all the cylinders. Spark was distributed, by a distributor which was for the most part a purely mechanical device. Going back a decade or two further, the spark event was created by breaker points, a mechanical contact that would ‘break’ a circuit at the time the spark was needed. These were crude devices by modern standards but they worked surprisingly well. Way further back, the model A Ford used 1 ignition coil per cylinder much like our featured Audi, however unlike the Audi’s precise computer controlled spark, the Ford’s coils fired continuously.

Our client brought his 2006 Audi A4 to us with the check engine light on and his engine running very roughly. Our diagnostic tests found that #3 cylinder ignition coil was dead. When we priced out the repair we were shocked at how inexpensive the ignition coil was: only $35.00. This is amazingly cheap, and for a name brand Bosch part, not some cheap white box part made in a low quality Chinese factory. Why so inexpensive? My guess is that they make a lot of them. This is a common engine and the ignition coils fit in many Audi and VW engines. This drives down the price, and it’s an advantage of buying a vehicle that is mainstream. Once you get into rare car makes or unusual models with limited sales, the price of parts usually goes up substantially.

This repair explodes the Myth that Audi’s and German cars in general are expensive to repair: sometimes they are very cheap to fix.

For more about the fabulous Audi A4 click here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi_A4

For more about ignition coils click here http://auto.howstuffworks.com/ignition-system5.htm

Audi A4

Ignition coil from Audi A4. The coil sits directly on top of the spark plug and is fired precisely when it receives a signal from the powertrain computer.

 

1998 Audi A4 Quattro – Numerous Repairs

Audi A4

Friday’s featured repair took the better part of the week and was performed on a 1998 Audi A4 Quattro with 2.8 liter V6 engine.

Audi A4

1998 Audi A4 Quattro V6

This Audi came to us with several concerns: it wouldn’t idle, the battery was dead, the A/C stopped working a couple of months ago and there was smoke coming out of the hood accompanied by a burning smell.

Our first steps were diagnostics on the no idling and a comprehensive inspection. We quickly found serious engine oil leaks which led to an oil leak diagnosis.

The A/C lack of function and the burning smell were caused by a melted A/C compressor clutch. Oil leaks were coming from valve cover gaskets, rear cam plugs and timing chain tensioner gaskets.

Our comprehensive inspection found the battery only needing a good recharge. We found the brakes, steering and suspension in good order but one wheel bearing was worn and both front outer CV boots were torn open.

After extensive repairs we got the Audi A4 back in good shape: the underhood smoke had stopped, the A/C blew cold and the engine idled smoothly. A few burned out bulbs were changed along with streaky wipers and dirty engine oil. The car runs like new and should be good for many more miles.

While Audi’s were once rather quirky cars they became more mainstream with the introduction of the A4 in the late 1990s. While not trouble free, these cars have proven to be very reliable and durable.

For more on the Audi A4 please see this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi_a4

If you’re interested in the history of Audi click this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi

Audi A4

Some of the parts that were replaced on this Audi A4: valve cover gaskets, wheel bearing, coolant hose, camshaft plug, timing chain tensioner gasket, CV boot, A/C compressor

2001 Audi A8- Timing Belt Replacement

Timing Belt

Friday’s featured service is Timing Belt Replacement on a 2001 Audi A8.

Timing Belt

2001 Audi A8

Timing Belt Replacements are a frequently performed service at our shop. Most of the time they are done as a maintenance service based on the vehicle’s mileage. This Audi’s timing belt however was replaced for a different reason.

Our featured Audi A8 came to our shop for an engine overheating concern.

After thorough diagnosis we concluded that the thermostat was defective, blocking coolant flow to the radiator and overheating the engine. On most cars thermostat replacement is a relatively inexpensive and straightforward repair. Not so on the Audi A8: this thermostat was buried deep inside the timing belt covers and required removal of the timing belt.

Sometimes one repair reveals another pressing concern and this was exactly the case with our Audi. When we removed the timing belt covers we found a timing belt so loose that it could have jumped teeth at any moment and probably caused severe and expensive engine damage.

After performing the timing belt replacement the owner was very pleased with the cars performance. Prior to repairs he had found it was sluggish when stepping on the gas pedal. Now it was very responsive and felt like a new car.

The Audi A8 is a magnificent car. It features a huge interior with comfortable seating for four large and long legged people. The performance is spectacular: just tap the gas pedal and you’re flying. Suspension and handling are very smooth.

One last thing about this Audi: initially we were not overly concerned about replacing the timing belt as the car only had 80,000 kilometers. Most timing belt replacement is considered by mileage however age of the car is clearly an important factor. Timing belt replacement should also be performed based on a car’s age.

For more on the Audi A8 check out this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi_a8

For more information about the timing belt please view this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timing_belt_%28camshaft%29

Timing Belt

New installed timing belt on Audi A8

 

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