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How We Saved a Client a Fortune on His Turbocharger Repair

Saving money is always a good thing; however when it comes to auto repairs be cautious because often along with low price comes inferior quality. We always strive for the highest quality at the best price and are very pleased when we can take the time to do a great job and save our client lots of money. Recently we did just that.

The vehicle serviced was a 2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee with a 3 liter Mercedes turbo diesel engine. While quite rare in Jeeps, it is common in various Mercedes vehicles and Sprinter vans.

Our client’s concern was a severe lack of power and the check engine lamp on. After diagnosis we determined the turbocharger to be defective. This vehicle uses a very complex variable geometry turbo which incorporates an integral electronic actuator. The actuator was the defective part but unfortunately was only available with a new turbo assembly. Rebuilding was not an option so it appeared that we were stuck to the dealer. Our client had already been to the Chrysler dealer where they also diagnosed the turbocharger as the problem. His quote was over $8000 installed. They were also not too reassuring as they stated that the engine computer could also be bad and substantial extra costs could be involved. We confirmed that only the turbo was defective

How We Saved a Client a Fortune on His Turbocharger Repair

Brand new turbo assembly, the black box near the bottom is the actuator unit which controls the variable geometry mechanism.

Our first phone call to the Chrysler dealer was a shock: the turbo assembly was over $6000 for a new unit. We spent some time looking at options: Mercedes dealers and ordering through a US Chrysler dealership and while these reduced the price it would still have run him around $7000 installed. After more digging we were able to purchase a new turbo directly from the manufacturer for under $3000. This is an exact original replacement part. Installed with taxes, his bill came in at under $5000, substantially lower than just the turbo from Chrysler.

After replacement the engine ran great, the check engine light was off and full power was restored. So sometimes low cost and quality do go hand in hand and when we can deliver high quality at a low price we will.

Why You Need Good Shocks and Struts

Shocks and struts are a major component of your vehicle’s suspension system and work hard to keep your vehicle firmly gripped to the road.  Though they generally last a long time they are a commonly wearing component on every vehicle. Unfortunately as a car ages and repair costs escalate shock and strut replacement often gets put on the back burner compromising the safety of the vehicle and wearing out other components. Lets look at what shocks and struts do, what goes wrong with them and what the consequences of not replacing worn ones are.

First off shocks and struts are both similar and different. They are similar in that the strut contains a shock absorber inside, the difference is that the strut forms the upper portion of the suspension geometry and incorporates a coil spring. As you might guess by this description struts are more expensive to replace. The part costs more along with extra labour. Shocks and struts can be found on the front or rear suspension of a vehicle.

Why You Need Good Shocks and Struts

Shock absorber on left, Strut on right. Note the added complexity of the strut

The purpose of the shock absorber is to stop the oscillation of the vehicle springs. Without them your car would continuously bounce on bumps and your ride would be extremely uncomfortable. Handling and braking would be severely compromised.

When shocks and struts wear you will experience a bouncy ride and along with this comes reduced stopping distance. This is perhaps the most important reason to replace worn out shocks and struts. Studies have found that worn shocks reduce stopping distance by 12 feet from a 100km/hr panic stop. That could make the difference between hitting the car in front of you or not. Cupped tire tread wear is another result of worn out shocks and struts and often this wear occurs when you cannot feel the usual bouncy ride associated with bad shocks. Many a set of good tires has been ruined adding expense to one’s auto service budget. Another casualty of worn shocks and struts are prematurely wearing front brakes. This occurs from too much vehicle weight transfer to the front wheels when braking.

Why You Need Good Shocks and Struts

Leaking shock absorber on 06 Honda Civic

 

Why You Need Good Shocks and Struts

Severely cupped tire tread. The yellow arrow points to high tread and the red arrow points to low tread. This causes loud road noise.

Many shock manufacturers recommend replacement at 80,000 kilometers. In my opinion this is excessive as they often last substantially longer on many vehicles. The best way to determine shock and strut condition is to assess vehicle ride on a regular basis along with a visual inspection of the suspension and tires.

While replacing shocks and struts can be an expensive service, the excellent ride, enhanced vehicle control and improved stopping distance make it more than great value for your money.

What Makes a Quality Brake Job

Brake repairs are one of the most common vehicle services. With so many shops doing them and such a variety of advertised ‘brake specials’ and prices how do you know if your brakes are being done properly and you are receiving good value for your money? Remember, cheap pricing usually comes with compromises in quality of parts and workmanship. Here’s what makes a good brake job.

It starts with a thorough inspection and that begins with a road test. The technician looks for brake pulls and vibrations when the brakes are applied and listens for noises. In the shop comes is a visual inspection of the brake fluid, looking for fluid level and quality of the fluid. The master cylinder and brake booster are visually inspected as are all brake lines and hoses. Wheels are then removed and brake pads and shoes are measured for thickness and evenness of wear. Brake rotors and drums are also measured for thickness and inspected for damage. Calipers and wheel cylinders are inspected for leakage and freedom of movement. Also visually inspected are ABS wires and proportioning valves and let’s not forget the operation of the parking brake. Other incidental but critical items safe braking are inspected such as wheel bearing play, shocks and struts and obviously loose steering and suspension components.

From the inspection an assessment of the brakes is made: which parts are in good condition and functioning well, and which items need repair now. A good shop will consult with you about how much you drive and where. This helps determine the urgency of repairs.

Let’s now look at repairs. A quality brake job involves not only replacement of parts but also thorough cleaning: caliper and pad sliders frequently get corroded and using a wire wheel or sandblaster to remove rust is essential. Hardware and self-adjusters for drum brakes requires disassembly and cleaning. After cleaning, components require lubrication with quality high temperature brake lubricants.

Quality of parts is very important to a successful trouble free repair: there are many grades of brake parts and using the best quality makes sense for longevity and the best stopping power. Cheap parts usually wear out faster; will cause squeals and other unwanted concerns.

Flushing brake fluid is a service often required with a brake job. Brake fluid absorbs water right out of the air and becomes contaminated. Many manufacturers recommend replacing the fluid every 2 years. When due, this becomes part of a quality brake repair.

After repairs, a thorough road test is done to be sure that your brakes are stopping your car as they should. Be aware that after many brake repairs you may find that your brakes make different sounds, the pedal feels different and there may also be odd smells and even smoke coming from replaced parts. All of these concerns should disappear within a day’s driving.

 

How We Save You Money By Repairing Instead Of Replacing

When it’s possible and we can be certain of doing a lasting repair we will choose to repair something instead of replacing it.

Here’s an example from a recent repair on a 2002 Acura MDX.

Our client’s concern was that the right headlamps were not working. During our diagnosis we found that the low beam bulb just installed by the client was defective and worked fine after we put in one of our own. The right high beam however did not work and I also noted that the DRL lamp on the dash was on and that the DRLs (Daytime Running Lamps) did not work. Diagnostic testing found that these concerns were caused by a defective DRL module. We were able to open up the module and while inspecting inside found a couple of dried up solder joints connecting a relay to the circuit board.

How We Save You Money By Repairing Instead Of Replacing

DRL circuit board: the yellow arrows point to the broken solder joints which only require resoldering to restore the DRL module to full operation

At this point repairs could go 2 ways:

1. Replace the DRL module; or 2. Solder the bad connections.

Our client opted for the 2nd option and saved over $100. That’s just one way that we save you money whenever we have the option.

How to Prolong the Life of Your Diesel Fuel Injectors

Diesel engines and diesel fuel injectors have changed remarkably in the past decade: gone are the rattly, smoky, stinky, low performance engines from the past.

Modern Diesel Fuel Injectors and Engines

Today we have the modern diesel: powerful and quick to accelerate, smoke free and quiet, with the added benefit of low exhaust emissions, and often times amazing fuel efficiency. 60+ mpg in a VW Jetta TDI is common!

There have been many changes that have allowed this remarkable transformation and one of the major contributors is the fuel injector which has undergone an enormous revolution.

How to Prolong the Life of Your Diesel Fuel Injectors

Dodge Cummins Diesel Injectors, old & new: The old mechanical injector is on the top and the new style, common rail injector on bottom

Diesel Fuel Injectors Deliver a Fine Spray of Fuel Under Very High Pressure.

On older engines all components within the injector were mechanical. The injection pump, again a purely mechanical device, precisely controlled the quantity of fuel to be injected.

Fast forward to today: the fuel injector’s controls are now electronic and the mechanical injection pump is gone. In its place is the common rail system. What common rail means is that all fuel injectors get their fuel from the same fuel rail under the same pressure. There a two types of common rail system: one with very high fuel pressure and another with low pressure fuel that uses high pressure engine oil to boost fuel to a very high pressure inside the injector.

While solenoids have been used inside the injectors the pinnacle of modern fuel injector technology is the piezoelectric crystal which, when electrically energized minutely changes the shape of the crystal and switches a small fuel chamber on and off. The on/off flow in the small fuel chamber triggers the top of the fuel injector to open and close and in turn spray fuel into the engine. The miracle of this injector is that it allows precise injection control to the millisecond.

Old diesels received only one shot of fuel during their combustion stroke while modern diesels receive several injections at precisely timed intervals and this has created the amazing engines that we have today. Through these timed injections more power is produced and the knocking sound, so common to diesel engines is virtually eliminated.

How do modern injectors fair for reliability?

Well they have their concerns and quite honestly many are problematic. However much of this may be due to recent changes in diesel fuel refining.

In the late 2000s, ultra low sulfur diesel fuels were introduced in North America. Minimal sulfur emission is great for the environment but unfortunately for the diesel fuel injector, the refining process removes some lubricants that are crucial to long injector life. All diesel engines built 2008 and newer have upgraded injectors but those prior will likely suffer early failures.

Injector failures show up in a number of ways such as long crank times or no starts, smoky exhaust (usually black) and rough running.

Poor maintenance can also affect injector life

With the expensive components in a diesel engine, performing oil and filter changes and fuel filter changes at or before the prescribed interval is essential.

Replacing modern injectors is very expensive, typically costing several hundred dollars per unit along with a very labour intensive operation. So you may wonder, what can I do to prolong the life of my injectors and avoid expensive repairs? There are several things:

First is to keep up your maintenance:

Change engine oil and filter regularly and replace fuel filters regularly.

Second is to add a lubricity additive to your fuel:

These additives will restore the lubricants missing from modern ultra low sulfur diesel and prolong the life of your injectors. While there is addition cost, some of these additives will boost the cetane rating of your fuel and pay for themselves with improved fuel mileage and performance.

Using the right fuel additive and performing proper maintenance will maximize your diesel fuel injector’s life: it’s a no-brainer that will save you thousands of dollars.

What Does Your Check Engine Light Mean

That orange lamp on your dash that either shows a picture of an engine or says “check engine” is often misunderstood so here is the check engine lamp demystified.

 

  • This light is there to indicate a malfunction with your vehicle’s engine management system.
  • On any vehicle 1996 and newer it will illuminate for any concern that will cause excessive vehicle emissions.
  • Many times when the light illuminates you will feel no difference in the way your vehicle runs. This is because many emission reduction systems on your vehicle do not affect the engine’s performance. At times when you don’t feel diminished performance it is because your powertrain computer is compensating for the defect and readjusting things so that performance feels normal.
  • As with all amber lights on your dash, an illuminated check engine lamp indicates a concern that needs to be addressed but it is not crucial that it be done immediately (unlike your red oil lamp which, should it illuminate means stop your engine NOW).
  • If your check engine lamp is blinking have repairs conducted as soon as possible. The blinking check engine lamp indicates a catalytic converter damaging engine misfire. Usually when the lamp blinks this will be accompanied by a rough running engine. Failure to repair the misfire quickly will damage your catalytic converters and cost you a lot of extra money.
  • If you go to AirCare with your check engine lamp on and your car is 1998 and newer you will fail the test! So save money and have it fixed first.
  • When your check engine lamp comes on it is rarely associated with low engine oil or low coolant. It is however wise to check these fluids just in case they are low.
What Does Your Check Engine Light Mean

The Check Engine Light: some lights show only the orange outline whereas others show only the letters

 

What if my engine runs fine and I just leave the check engine lamp? If your lamp is on it is most important to get a diagnosis as soon as possible. Some items are more critical to repair than others as is the case with engine misfires. Other items can be left if your budget doesn’t allow for repairs today but it is best to know the urgency and the consequence of not doing the repairs now.

How to Save Money on Car Repairs

The best way to save money on car repairs is simple:

It’s with routine maintenance.

Routine maintenance means that at specific time intervals, based on how much you drive, you have your car serviced following a maintenance schedule.

The very minimum schedule that should be followed is the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule. Following this schedule will make certain that you fulfill all of your requirements should you have a warranty claim. Some manufacturer’s schedules are more thorough than others and a good maintenance shop will review the schedule and make additional suggestions to help further maintain your vehicle.

It is almost always cheaper to do Car Repairs before they break. Here are a few examples:

One oil change every 6,000 kilometers for 60,000 Km equals 10 oil changes and a total cost of around $600.00. A lack of oil changes causing a blown engine is $4,000.00 and could easily cost double that based on the type car that you drive.

An average, thorough timing belt replacement (with water pump, pulleys and oil seals) can range from $1,000.00 to $1,500.00. Neglecting it and letting the belt break puts you back in the $4,000.00 and probably far more expensive price range.

Replacing brakes before they start grinding could be as low in cost as $300.00 but if left until grinding could easily run you $700.00 or far more.

Other Tangible costs:
• Towing
• Lost work hours
• Arranging transportation to and from the Repair Shop

Intangible costs:
• The stress of readjusting your schedule
• Being without your car when you need it

Through routine maintenance you will know the condition and lifespan of many of your vehicle’s parts. At specific intervals critical services like oil changes and fluid flushes will be done extending the life of your vehicle.

Will routine maintenance eliminate all surprises? Unfortunately it will not, but it substantially increases your odds of trouble free driving.

save money on car repairs

1 Page of a maintenance schedule for 2005 Ford F350 6.0L Diesel

So there is your key to save money on car repairs: Maintenance, Maintenance, Maintenance!

How A Prepurchase Inspection Saves You Thousands

“Trust me: it’s a good car.”
“You don’t need a prepurchase inspection, we can offer you a powertrain warranty.”
“We’ve done an inspection on this vehicle and it all checks out.”

Those were comments made by the salesman to a recent client who brought in a 1997 Nissan Quest for a prepurchase inspection. Fortunately our client was smart and insisted on an inspection, and it is something that should be done every time you purchase a vehicle.

You really don’t know by just driving it what potentially expensive repairs may be required.

This vehicle was only priced at $2900 and was 15 years old so I wasn’t expecting perfection. On the plus side there were only 124,000 kilometers on the clock and the body and interior were in good condition.

Phase One of Our Prepurchase Inspection

We walk around the vehicle, inspect the interior controls and then go for an extended road test. The vehicle felt fine with the exception of a slight wobble in the steering wheel probably caused by a bad tire. There was also a noticeable humming noise present when the engine was running. Overall the vehicle felt good.

Phase Two of the Pre-purchase Inspection

This involves an under hood and then an under vehicle inspection.

Under the hood, most everything looked very good except that the battery was in very poor condition (in spite of being only a year old).

Under the vehicle, on the hoist things looked good for the steering and suspension systems… except for a slight rack and pinion leak which in time will turn a into costly repair. The tires, as we suspected from the road test had problems: the rears were almost legally worn out and the fronts had several sidewall indentations.

Phase Three of the Inspection

This involves removing the wheels and inspecting the brakes, and here we found some concerns: front brake pads had 3 millimeters remaining which is close to worn out. Worse still, both rear wheel cylinders were leaking and on the right side badly enough to have soaked the brake shoes. Clearly these rear brakes would not pass a government safety inspection.

As a result of the inspection our client now knows fully what he is getting for his $2900:

A 15 year old van with low mileage and in pretty good condition overall but requiring some immediate repairs to brakes, tires and battery. Some time down the road repairs to the steering rack and the fuel pump (that was the humming noise that we mentioned earlier) will be needed. He can use this inspection to either negotiate a better price for the vehicle or simply move onto something else.

The prepurchase inspection gave him the truth in order to make an informed decision!

prepurchase inspection

Right rear brake showing leaking wheel cylinder and brake shoes soaked with brake fluid: a definate safety concern

Poor Maintenance Can Void Your Warranty

Poor Maintenance Can Void Your Warranty

It seems innocent enough… your car’s working great, you live an incredibly busy life, you drive a lot and the car’s new. Why bother following your vehicle’s maintenance schedule?

We encounter this scenario at our shop from time to time. It shows up as a vehicle that has not been maintained to factory specs; in fact the factory schedule has been completely ignored. The consequence of this is two fold: first, damage is taking place to your vehicle even if you can’t feel it right now; and second, your warranty will be void should you need to make a claim.

Recently we had a client who came in for his first oil change on a Japanese vehicle with 50,000 kilometers on the odometer. It was quite frankly a miracle that his engine was still running but it was and in fact running fine.

However tell tail signs of abuse were present as grungy deposits were visible inside the engine. Hopefully this is one of those rare engines that can take excessive abuse and still survive: we do see that… not very often, but sometimes.

What is perhaps worrying is that, should our client have an engine problem, he will have no warranty coverage as he has not followed the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule. This could be very costly as a replacement engine job could be $5000.00 or more. Five oil changes costs around $300.00 and more should have been done, but 5 would have satisfied the manufacturer’s schedule.

That’s a huge cost difference.

Be certain to follow your maintenance schedule: it definitely saves you lots of money and gives you peace of mind. Remember – poor maintenance can void your warranty.

Poor Maintenance Can Void Your Warranty

Oil dipstick after 50,000 km with no oil change. Note the baked on deposit and sludge to the right of the bump in the stick (center of photo): this will be present inside the engine and likely lead to an early engine failure

We Don't Use Fearmongering!

Fearmongering is a sales technique used by some shops, and sadly, as it is so often associated with dishonest recommendations gives the auto service industry a bad reputation.

We recently had a client who brought her vehicle to us for a second opinion about some brake work that she was told was absolutely, immediately required and “must be done today or her car would be dangerous to drive”. We inspected her brakes (several days later) and found that the rear brake pads still had 4 millimeters remaining which is a far cry from needing immediate replacement. Yes they were nearly worn out but not dangerous. Through using this technique this shop not only destroyed their credibility but tarnished the reputation of the auto service industry.

We advised our client that based on her driving habits her brakes would be perfectly safe for at least 3 to 6 more months. Four months had passed and we replaced her rear pads and rotors. She had driven 11,000 kilometers and those brake pads that were supposedly unsafe still had 3 millimeters remaining. Three millimeters is worn out but still not unsafe.

There are times when we find something on a car that is unsafe and requires immediate repairs but this is rare. In this sort of case we can show you the concern while the car is on the hoist or if this is not possible send a video or photo via e-mail. We always educate our clients on what is good and what is worn or requiring servicing on their vehicle and let them choose when to repair it.

Getting back to the fearmongering shop, a better, and more honest approach would be to advise the client that their brakes are almost worn out and instead of falsely creating fear and attempting to sell work this shop could have built trust through honesty and waited for a few months to do the service.

We Don't Use Fearmongering!

Close-up of worn out rear brake pad, note the yellow arrows which show the remaining pad material which is 3 mm thick (new pads are 8 mm)

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In order to provide an estimate, a diagnosis is the next step!